Sunday, June 15

The EU in the Media Spotlight

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The Sunday newspapers are full of the consequences of the Irish referendum on the Lisbon Treaty today, and barely anything else is reported on the EU front Booker devotes the larger part of his column to an excellent analysis in the Sunday Telegraph.
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In coming days, he writes, we shall see the degrading spectacle of the EU's political class wheeling out their long-prepared formula for ignoring the Irish verdict, and imposing their constitution-by-any-other-name regardless.
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The European project will be revealed for what it has been all along: a mighty system of state power, run by the political class with lofty contempt for the people it rules. However, there is going to be a great deal of "noise", which will blur the picture, obfuscate and confuse rather than enlighten. A good example of this is the single newspaper, The Sunday Times, which manages two mutually contradictory headlines: "Britain presses on with Lisbon ratification" and "No 10 admits treaty is finished".
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When that second story also reports that, "In the short term, Brown will press ahead with Britain's own ratification process," thus inherently contradicting its own claim, it is evident that the paper is all over the place and has nothing useful to offer.Despite that, the leader is staunchly written, with the title: "Contempt for democracy".
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That is helpful because it cements in precisely the message that should apply to this corrupt construct, the European Union. As for the content of the leader, don't bother reading it. It is as incoherent as the news pieces.
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Nevertheless, whether the EU supporters are successful or not in ramming their treaty though, things will never be the same. In that sense, the Irish referendum has been valuable. It shows the "colleagues" as the power-grabbing fanatics that they really are. Merely the number of comments on the online stories, and their tone, demonstrates that the EU has been seriously damaged.That much is also evident from the sheer volume of coverage, which has now grown to a torrent, Google News at one time registering over 7,000 stories on the issue. The EU is suddenly pinned in the spotlight and, as the heads of states and governments gather for their European Council on Thursday, every move they make will be being watched.

As this blog has commented many times in the past the accumulative negative effects of the business community (particularly small businesses) of the EU has not been effectively responded to by any of the UK's business pressure groups despite the wishes of most small and medium businesses. (The delegates of the rank and file Members of the Federation of Small Businesses have twice (1995 and 2001) voted to call for a withdrawal from the EU at the organisation's national confrences.)
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Howsoever now, with the media in full flight with the glare of the all the media spotlight so intense, some EU politicians may crack under the pressure and break ranks. There is just a chance that the best laid plans of mice and commissioners might fall apart and the wealth creators of Western Europe (small and medium business) will great a break from the nightmare of the EU.
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1 comment:

Peter Lindsay said...

I simply do not believe that the "No" vote "doubled" in three weeks in Ireland.

The pollsters were deliberately trying to influence the result in a "Yes" direction by reducing the "no" vote, and when they realised that they had failed , they decided that they should make it bit more accurate so that they would not look too far out when the result was announced.

Political pollsters are at the very heart of the anti-democratic tyranny we are all fighting.

We saw the same manipulation in 2004 in the North East referendum on a regional assembly . Right up until a week before the vote the polls were "neck and neck" , then there was a "sudden collapse" in the yes vote in the last week. In reality the pollsters were trying to bolster the Yes vote.