Sunday, November 13

At the Cenotaph

Peter Troy in Whitehall



This morning in Whitehall the Queen led the nation in a service of memorial for British and Commonwealth war dead.
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Even before the cannons signalled the start of the two minutes silence (steadfastly observed by all present), there was a respectful hush amongst the gathered crowds, numbering some tens of thousands.
The respectful silence was in marked contrast to the rapturous applause given to over 8,000 older soldiers as they marched past younger generations.
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All my adult life and most of my childhood, I have watched the service on television but up until today, had not attended the ceremony at Whitehall. The service remains unchanged for decades, it is meaningful, moving and majestic. Like The Cenotaph itself, (designed by Edward Lutyens in 1920), the service is simple yet poignant.
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Lest we, as a nation, forget our History.
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Below are some images of the day.
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Reflecting on the day, left March past by the Ghurkas, right.

Korean War veteran, Ron Wells, at his 22nd Cenotaph march.
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. Left and above, a very British service, tea for all.

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.Real ale at the Red Lion, Whitehall.

2 comments:

Kelly said...

You are right in that the British do know how to hold a very meaningful service. We had similar events planned here in the states for our veterans and heroes, for those who have already given their lives and those whose lives may yet still be in danger. It was a time for all of us to reflect on what we have because of the men and women who have fought for us.

There were several restraunts in the city that I live that gave meals away to veterans, their families, and any other military personnel. This is a small gift for them to give but one that I know is much appreciated.

Thank you all, living and dead, for the sacrifices you have made to give me and to protect for me the rights that I enjoy. I do deeply appreciate it.

David Samyth said...

I enjoyed looking at your pictures. I was also there in Whitehall, with my Father a soldier of WWII who is now 90. Keep up the good work on this site. David Smyth